Between April and September, 2015, The Victoria and Albert Museum held an exhibition titled, What is Luxury? Finding myself, one Summer day, in town and at a loose end, I decided to pop in and find out…

Luxury, I’ve always believed, is something different for each of us, and not always something tangible. Ask a busy, working parent, how they’d feel to have you magic up a few extra hours in their day…

It seems, at least to me, the entire concept of luxury is ever changing for all of us. Something we aspire to but, once attained, so often loses its appeal. There’s always something new to strive for, and we do…

Luxury, in the recent past, became something we were all encouraged was our right to own. Well established, luxury brands, strove to expand their market and, seeing them achieve it, new brands launched themselves, hoping to follow suit with a message that each of us deserves to have it all.

But luxury was never intended for the masses; exclusivity, scarcity, aspirationally unaffordable and out of reach of the majority are things that traditionally helped define it.

This causes, quite often, a dilemma for many who design and make truly desirable objects. To create rarefied pieces of work, be it a fine, hand-stitched kid leather handbag or mouth-blown chandelier, is indicative of passion, skill beyond compare and an infinite reserve of patience. Time does not lend itself to such things, limiting production no matter how virtuous the intention.

Large, well established luxury brands are in a position to create the allure of luxury with their name alone, lending it to the mass produced and relatively more affordable. And consumers, fickle, as consumers can be, are feeling slightly short changed… To suddenly, and with relative ease, find yourself in possession, along with many others, that which formerly was up to covet, isn’t all that was expected.

Scarcity and exclusivity are to luxury what water is to fish; essential.

And so, it seems, luxury has reinvented itself once again. Global brands have their place but it’s the small, artisan craftspeople, whose motivation is their passion for design and commitment to ever developing their expertise, to whom the discerning are now turning. Investing in people, not mega brands, whose years spent honing skills few others possess resonates on a deeply human level. There’s immense satisfaction in taking ownership of a unique piece of artwork, jewellery or indeed furniture determined by endless hours of craft, patience and skill and bound to last more than simply one lifetime.

So, returning to the exhibition and what I learned that day. What is my luxury? Well, like you, values, circumstances, personal style and taste, plus many other factors will determine what we covet. For the artisans of The Rusland Movement, the opportunity to continue their craft, creating heirlooms of the future, is luxury enough…